Aurora borealis

Aurora borealis

Few of the phenomena are so mesmerizing, like the vibrating northern lights. Although this fleeting phenomenon can take many forms – column, bands, beams and halo of vibrating light – the most unforgettable sight is the aurora resembling a pale drapery, lifted by a gentle breeze. Most often, the northern lights appear pale green, light yellow or pink glow, which can change color to bright yellow or crimson during periods of peak activity. In Norway, there is aurora boręalis, northern lights, unlike the corresponding phenomenon in the other hemisphere, aurora australis, northern lights. The mysterious phenomenon visible in the sky is actually caused by streams of electrically charged particles from the sun and by the solar winds, flowing through the Earth's magnetic field and extending it in the polar regions. As the field curves downward in the halo area, surrounding the magnetic poles, charged particles are attracted towards the Earth. Their interaction with electrons, occurring in the upper atmosphere (ok. 160 km from the surface) leads to the release of energy, which creates the visible aurora. During periods of high activity, a single aurora can produce trillion watts of power with a current of one million amperes.

Eskimosi (They bear lnuit) define the aurora with the word arsarnerite (play football). They believe, that their ancestors are playing football with the skull of a walrus. They also believe, that the aurora can be whistled or scared away, imitating a dog barking! The Inuit also give this phenomenon a spiritual meaning, often believing, that it reflects the games of unborn babies. Others consider them a gift of the dead, who light up the long polar nights, and still others for a place, in which past and future events accumulate.

Although scientists put such views between fairy tales, most people say, that the aurora is often accompanied by a drone sound. So don't be surprised, gdy się go usłyszy; a jeżeli nawet nauka wykaże, że to tylko iluzja, trzeba przyznać, że bardzo przekonująca.

Północną zorzę w Norwegii najlepiej obserwować od października do marca, chociaż na dalekim południu można ją zobaczyć nawet już w sierpniu Co ciekawe, Svalbard leży zbyt daleko na północy, by można tu było obserwować większą aktywność zorzy.